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Severe fin rot


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#1 Daphne5

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 09:11 PM

Hi. I've done a lot of research and my Betta has fin rot which has turned severe. She had frayed fins which had come and gone, but I have a 2.5 gallon tank and have realized not cleaning my tank as frequently as I should and now as a result my fish is very ill. He is eating fine still but all of a sudden a huge chunk of his fins were gone so having trouble swimming. I've done 100 percent water change daily now for five days, lowered water to 1 gallon and turned off filter for less stress. Temp is between 74-76 and didn't have heater in before which I've read also is a cause for fin rot. I've read several forums and they recommended 2 teaspoons/gallon dissolved and have treated with Erythromycin now for 4th day. However, with large powder dosing in packets, I'm hoping I've calculated the correct amount. I went to our local high end fish store today, and they recommended Betta Revive!, along with salt (he only recommended 1 teaspoon per gallon). I've been reading a lot, and it seems like many people do not recommend Revive. My Betta also has white fuzz at end of where fin was lost. I know what I've done wrong to get my poor fish to this condition, just wondering what the best course of treatment for his fin rot. He lays mostly on bottom of tank but becomes active when he sees me and still is eating very happily.
Thanks for your advice.
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#2 Susurro

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 05:29 PM

If you are seeing sudden fin loss, it is more likely that your fish is biting his fins rather than having them rot off. Is it possible for you to get pics of your guy and post them here? You'll need to upload them to a site like photobucket and then post links here. 

 

Also, could you please fill this out to give us answers to some other questions, it would help us out. 

 

SYMPTOMS
Appearance Changes:
Behavior Changes:
Eating Habits:
Other:

WATER STATS
Ammonia:
Nitrate:
Nitrite:
pH:
Hardness:
Alkalinity:
Time you noticed the illness:

TANK
Size:
Temp:
Filtration/Aeration:

HUSBANDRY PRACTICES
Frequency of Tank Cleaning:
Water Additives:
Feeding (food type/frequency):
Tank Mates:

TREATMENT
Any treatment so far and when:

HISTORY
List any past health problems: 



#3 Daphne5

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 06:12 PM

Hi. Thx for reply. His fins were separated And had a gap for a bit. I thought I had it under control, but then it went extreme and saw him sideways. He's still fairly active when he sees me and will eat as much as I'll give him. Thanks for your time. He seems to be perking up a bit today but looks like infection might be on edge of body?

photobucket.com/user/Lisaexcel/library/


SYMPTOMS
Appearance Changes: missing chunk fin, having trouble stabilizing when swimming but will swim for food!
Behavior Changes: lethargic, laying at bottom of tank, but moves when sees me
Eating Habits: I feed Nutrafin Max flakes or freeze dried blood worms, few flakes/pieces (3) 2Xday
Other:

WATER STATS: Been doing 100 percent water changes daily for four days now
Ammonia:
Nitrate:
Nitrite:
pH:
Hardness:
Alkalinity:
Time you noticed the illness:

TANK
Size: 2.5 gallons
Temp: 72-76
Filtration/Aeration: yes

HUSBANDRY PRACTICES
Frequency of Tank Cleaning: not enough, 100 percent every 2-3 weeks
Water Additives: used to use Tetra Bettasafe and 1/2 tsp Aquarium Salt per water change
Feeding (food type/frequency): Nutrafin Max flakes, freeze dried blood worms, occasionally Wardly Betta pellets
Tank Mates: none

TREATMENT
Any treatment so far and when: last 4 days, 100 percent water changes, keeping to one gallon on tank so less stress to swim to too, turned off filter, 2 teaspoons Aquarium Salt, 4 days, API Erythromycin 4 days. Went to local aquarium shop yesterday, he told me to start using Betta Revive! for 3 days, today would be day 2, and bought better water conditioner, Stress-x, water temp been 76 last 24 hours, as high as my tiny disk heater will take it in one gallon.

HISTORY
List any past health problems: none, ripped or split fin few months, occasional Bettafix

#4 WigglePuppy

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 06:19 PM

That's not finrot. That's a tumor at the base of his tail. Nothing is ever going to grow back there and the tumor is going to kill him unfortunately. Tumors are becoming more and more frequent in bettas, probably due to poor genetics in mass bred fish for petstores.

 

His tank is also too cold, turn up the heater to 78-82 degrees.

 

Keep him comfortable in his last days. His tumor is very advanced and the reason he's acting lethargic is likely because it is throughout his body. Turning up the temp may help though, fish are cold blooded and bettas are very warm water fish.


Edited by WigglePuppy, 08 October 2013 - 06:19 PM.


#5 Daphne5

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 06:42 PM

Really? Wow. That's awful. Someone else looked at it and said finrot as its white going into his body no stop salt, too, or continue with water changes? Thx again

#6 Susurro

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Posted 11 October 2013 - 09:14 PM

Even if that was fin rot to begin with, I believe that it is far to advanced to treat at this point. Because it has progressed that far up his fins and into his body, I don't think that he is going to be able to come back. Normally fin rot is something that spreads to all the fins and makes them have a melted look, it doesn't make the fins just fall off like that. 

 

I think that your only real course of action is to keep him comfortable, or if you are comfortable with it you can euthanize him, by keeping his water as clean as possible and nice and warm. 



#7 Daphne5

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 08:48 AM

Thanks so much. Poor thing passed yesterday. I appreciate your time.

#8 amethyst

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Posted 16 October 2013 - 08:00 PM

I'm sorry to hear about your loss. I hope you aren't blaming yourself too much. Many of us made mistakes when we started with fishkeeping, and pet store employees are often uninformed and give wrong information about fish in general and bettas in particular. Now that you know more about what bettas need to thrive, if you decide to get another one you have a much better chance of having a healthy fish for it's full life cycle of 3 to 5 years or more.

 

Best of luck.



#9 Daphne5

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Posted 16 October 2013 - 08:37 PM

Thank you so much for your post. Yes, was feeling awful either way and this was nice to hear. I will get another Betta soon and reading up on cycling which seems very cumbersome for a 2.5 gallon tank. I'm thinking if I do 100 water changes every week should be ok. Any advice on this? Thanks again.

#10 amethyst

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Posted 16 October 2013 - 09:48 PM

I prefer a cycled tank, but I haven't tried to do it in a tank quite that small. I have been able to establish and maintain a cycle in 3 - 3.5g tanks, but it has taken longer and needs to be watched more closely than a larger tank in terms of testing for ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, etc.  Even with a stable cycle you will probably be doing partial water changes weekly on a 2.5g tank. Also, in a small tank the amount of current can be a problem for bettas, depending on the type of filter. I use small sponge filters like the #11 Azoo Oxygen Plus (available at http://drsfostersmith.com if you can't find it locally). You'll also need an air pump (I personally like the Whisper pumps which are relatively inexpensive and quiet), airline tubing, and a valve to adjust air flow, sold in the same sections of a store or website as the pumps and tubing. The sponge is good for bettas because it has no edges or intake tubes that could be problematic for their fins, and it's easy to adjust air flow with valve mentioned above. Of course you can continue to use whatever filter you have now, also. If you have the space and the money to invest in a larger tank (3.5 - 5g is good, larger even better) it will be easier to cycle. Live plants also help with water quality as well as providing interest, places for the betta to rest, etc.

 

If you decide to cycle, do it before you get another betta. Though some people use inexpensive fish like feeder guppies to create ammonia for the cycling process, I believe fishless cycling is more ethical. Also, fish sold as feeders might be carriers of who knows what bacteria, etc., which you don't need in your tank. Regular ammonia from a grocery store will work, as will more specialized ammonias recommended in articles about fishless cycling, and adding fish food to the tank daily also works. If you don't already have one, get a test kit that measures at least ammonia, nitrite and nitrate. Many of us on this site use the Master Test Kit by API, which also has the reagents to test for pH levels, but there are other brands which are probably just as good. Make sure the kit uses liquid reagents and test tubes - don't bother with the dip-strip type of test, which are notoriously unreliable and more expensive in the long run, because you have to buy new strips a LOT more frequently than new bottles of the liquid reagents used by the API kit and other liquid test kits.

 

If you decide not to cycle, you definitely need to do 100% water changes at least weekly, maybe more often. The best way to figure this out is to measure ammonia levels every couple of days and change the water as soon as there is any detectable ammonia. The test kit mentioned above tests for ammonia, but if you're not cycling you don't need the nitrite and nitrate tests, so you can just buy the ammonia test kit and save yourself some money. Again, API makes one, as do other companies. Once you know how long it generally takes for ammonia to show up in the water you can establish a water-change schedule to reflect that. It's still good to check the ammonia level at least weekly, though, because the level can change unexpectedly for a number of reasons. For example, introducing or removing plants, more or less algae, a change in the amount of food eaten - more eaten provides more waste and therefore more ammonia, and if some isn't eaten and remains in the tank the decomposing food adds ammonia, etc.

 

The tagged articles in the various sections of this website are invaluable and will answer many of the questions you may still have, but feel free to ask anything you can't find elsewhere. That's why we're all here, after all - to share information and enthusiasm about our fish.



#11 Daphne5

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Posted 17 October 2013 - 01:28 PM

Thanks for all that advice. It's super helpful. My filter was the Azoo Mignon Filter 60. It has adjustable flow but wondering if maybe too much. I didn't realize I would also need an air pump As well. I will read up on a bunch of this. Thanks so much.




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