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Adding a Filter to a 5 gallon already nhabited


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#1 Prowlsgurl

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 06:28 PM

I bought my CTPK about 2 months ago and we've had some time together. At first he didn't eat and he would get me so frustrated, but with coaxing and determination we were able to make a strong friendship. I love this little guy like no tomorrow and want what's best for him. His 1rst birthday is tomorrow too! Lol anyways back to topic. So my little guy lives in a 5 gallon tank, unfiltered and I do water changes once a week. Lately his tank has developed an odd odor but his water levels are good, 0ppm in both ammonia and nitrites. He's eating alright, but I was wondering whether or not a filter would be a good choice to add. And to do this would I have to cycle the tank?

#2 RAH

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 07:01 PM

A filter is not really necessary if your not going to cycle it. What sort of smell is it? Is it like rotten eggs?

#3 Prowlsgurl

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 07:36 PM

A filter is not really necessary if your not going to cycle it. What sort of smell is it? Is it like rotten eggs?


Hmm, let me see. No it's more like something baking, like in the sauna room ya know with that odd smell. I think it might be some food stuck to the hood and might be being burned from the light. And for cycling it, would you recommend cycling it at this point? I'm going to do a 100% water change tomorrow if that's alright.

#4 RAH

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 09:27 PM

Cycled tanks are much easier to maintain and are probably a lot easier on your fish at water change time.

#5 Prowlsgurl

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 06:13 AM

Cycled tanks are much easier to maintain and are probably a lot easier on your fish at water change time.


So cycling it would be a good idea, alright. So what would you recommend doing to cycle the tank since he's already in it?

#6 Eratic-Fish-Finatic

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Posted 06 April 2012 - 07:38 PM

So cycling it would be a good idea, alright. So what would you recommend doing to cycle the tank since he's already in it?

Well since he's already in the tank and is doing well, your tank should already be cycled. Cycling a tank is the process in which you are trying to establish the water so that it can build up in beneficial bacteria and dissolve and neutralize heavy metals in the water. Thus making a environment suitable for your newly added fish or fish your going to add. Having a filter will definitely help, as it will help keep your tank more healthy and lively. It will also decrease the amount of water you need to change. I usually do 30% water changes in my tanks, that leaves a stable amount of beneficial bacteria so your fish isn't as stressed when you do the water change.

Edited by Eratic-Fish-Finatic, 06 April 2012 - 07:40 PM.


#7 glasshaven

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Posted 07 April 2012 - 12:16 PM

I have a 5 gallon divided tank hereon my computer desk. It doesn't have a HOB filter; I use a sponge filter instead.

#8 PeachesMarie

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Posted 07 April 2012 - 04:23 PM

I recommend just keeping the levels as low as you can. Frequent water changes and the like. I don't know what else you could do if you are doing a fish-in cycling method.

If you have a container he could live in for about, one that is big enough to heat, you could just move him for that time and put ammonia in the tank to cycle. You can buy it at the store, just have to make sure there is nothing but ammonia in it. I've heard that fish food works as well.




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