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Good toys for puppies?


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#1 Harlequin

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 06:02 PM

Our two are loveable and wonderful. They really are, but I fear that they may be under-stimulated a bit. They have a big squeaky toy that is bigger than they are that they like to drag around, a rope toy (soft, fibers don't come out easily), and a cloth covered small Kong ball. But they seem to ignore these and chew on the carpet? I realize that they're young, 8 weeks old, and are probably teething/cutting teeth and are just trying to get rid of the discomfort. But does anyone else have anything that's helped their young dogs? It's becoming quite tedious to try to get them from chewing on the carpet and replace it with something else when they drop it 30 seconds later and go back to chewing on the carpet.

Needless to say, they can only access the carpet when supervised. But this brings up another point. They freak out when they are separated. If we try to take one puppy outside and keep the other one inside, they freak out and poop and pee on everything. Is this normal? Is there anything we can do about this other than trying to separate them more slowly? We're getting a second crate soon so that they can sleep separately, but next to one another, and will see how that goes.

#2 ~KK~

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 07:20 PM

Sounds like they have separation anxiety from one another, as I've never had or seen pups freak out when separated like that. Separating for short periods of time and increasing the time will help, as well as providing positive reinforcement for both pups when they are NOT freaking out while separated will help as well.

As for chewing the carpet, do they have specific areas they like to chew? Maybe they need more walks/play time? Something that works for rabbits is putting a tiny dab of perfume in the spot they chew keeps them away as it's too strong. Also, perhaps they'd enjoy a bone that is edible, like a nylabone or a good quality rawhide or bone.

Other ideas for stimulation would be different types of treats, TRAINING (starting young is a really good idea and it's fun for both parties. just don't spend more than 15 minutes on a session as they get bored), a toy that drops kibble when pushed around...yeah that's all I can think of right now :P

I miss having puppies. They're so much fun!

Edited by ~KK~, 29 March 2012 - 07:23 PM.


#3 Harlequin

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 07:48 PM

They are majorly food oriented, yes! We'll definitely be picking up some toys that we can stuff things inside, as well as getting a few bones and rawhides for them to have (while supervised, of course). It's not specific spots on the carpet, just the carpet in general. As my SO puts it, "they chew wherever they stop and notice it."

And yes, I do think it's separation anxiety. Since they're littermates, they've never been separated, really, and are too young to feel comfortable being independent (at least, I think). It's mainly the little girl, as we're pretty sure she's the dominant and feels the need to keep her brother in sights at all times. We're hoping that by having them spend some time in their crates right next to each other, it'll help.

#4 Solitarianknight

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 08:06 PM

We just delt with this with the class pups. They get a TON of interaction with the kids of course, and the other farm animals. If you can, socializing at a young age seems to do some good. Of course, you'll want to wait until everyone's vaccinated and is safe to roam the outside world :P Ours played with the older chicks XD. It was part of teaching them not to hurt the chickens when they grow up. Of course you have to watch the lil buggers like a hawk. I think the one, cooper, likes his chew rope and tennis ball a LOT lol.

#5 ~KK~

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 08:33 PM

Be prepared for that first night in different crates to be a NIGHTMARE. She's going to whine and cry and probably scratch but she'll settle down eventually :). Once they're comfortable with that, you can try having them in separate crates with a blanket in between them as well so they can't see each other, but they can smell and hear.

Oh, and make sure the crates are just big enough for them to lay down, stand, and turn around comfortably. Doing that helps prevent most accidents because they think of it as their sleeping place and don't have a place to soil.

Edited by ~KK~, 29 March 2012 - 08:35 PM.

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