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Pictures of my new Albimarginatas


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#13 coder

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Posted 18 February 2012 - 10:45 PM

Thanks for the feeding advice guys. I will definately try doing a switch from black worms to some frozen brine shrimp. I'll have to investigate Repashy gel, I've never heard of it. So far I like feeding live food because I can keep the water super clean. Nothing left on the bottom to go bad. I have been trying to get a good picture of my male, he gets really orange, but I never have the camera handy when he is displaying. I've kept alot of fish before, these guys may well be my favorite, so another question to the Albi veterans, introducing pathogens via live food, or plants has been a fear of mine. I know albis are really sensitive to velvet disease. What can I do prevenative health wise to make sure my little guys don't get sick, and what should I have on hand if it happens? Are they doesed any differently than any other fish?

#14 sde09001

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 06:34 AM

I've never had an issue with velvet with mine, just the males getting this weird legion on their gill plates after releasing fry adn then dying form it. Never been able to ID what it is, and I had one that looked like he was getting better and was dead the next day. If I were to treat with meds I'd do them at about 2/3 dosage. As far as pathogens introduced to the tank, I've never had an issue, but rinse your plants before adding them, and if you're worried about them coming in on foods then don't feed live foods unless you've bred and raised them yourself and can prove they don't have any diseases. I know that's not what you want to hear but it's the only way I know to ensure they are clean. hope this helps.

#15 majerah

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 12:29 PM

Yes feeding cultuures you have done is best so you can do the quality control.One reason blackworms are so easy to introduce pathogens is because not many do the safe handling of them.I myself amm to scared o mess with them I am just too attached to my fish to have them go this way.

Also,try to get them on some pellets.My macs are now on small pellets from mega one and I have seen nothing but improvement in them.Albis of course are smaller so try the betta pellets from them.

#16 coder

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 03:30 AM

Tried some betta pellets, too big. Crushed them, one of my females ate a few of the pieces of crushed pellet. The other 3 had no interest. Tried frozen brine shrimp and this also did not generate too much interest, a few of them took frozen brine shrimp then spit them out. It would appear I have a very picky little crew. I've cut back on the black worms and have been feeding mostly daphnia. I have a booming daphnia culture in a 10 gallon garden bucket, so at the time daphnia are plentiful. If my daphnia culture ever crashed (as they sometimes do) I would be in trouble though.

#17 sde09001

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 07:06 AM

Mine won't touch pellets either so you're not alone. It may be a time thing though. Most fish won't eat a new type of food right off the bat and will take time to get used to it, but few people are willing to let their fish go that long with out eating until they decide to try the new food. I recommend frozen bloodworms. They seem to be the favorite for all of my fish. I'm surprised they aren't going after the brine shrimp though, that stuff is like candy to most fish (about as nutritional as candy too so not really a good staple). Can you start another smaller tank with a daphnia culture too as a back up should your main culture fail?

#18 majerah

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 07:25 AM

One way I have been able to get fish onto pellets is by target feeding with a worm cone.This little thing suctions to the tank.You add the frozen cube to it and eventually they learn that spot = food.Then you can remove the cone part and float the pellets in the ring.They eventually get that its food and will start eating easier.

As for the type of pellets for albis,the atison betta pro is small enough for them.Its wort a shot to try because the pellets are more nutritionally complete and will balance the diet.

#19 coder

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 03:21 AM

Ahhh, good stuff. I just completed construction on a multi level tank stand that can hold 4 40 gallons, 16 ten gallons, or so on. Not that it will. It has 4 ten gallons on it now which are mostly grow out tanks. But I can definately add a back up daphnia colony. I was thinking about that, and trying to culture my own black worms. Luckily I already have a worm cone in the albi tank, that's how I have been delivering live black worms. That is a great idea about the pellets in the ring which I will try. They haven't quite figured it out yet. One of my females likes to hang out in the ring part, but when I put worms in it they just circle around below like sharks waiting for the worms to fall. They haven't figured out to come to the cone yet.

#20 coder

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Posted 25 February 2012 - 03:48 AM

OK, so when I set up my tank I used RO water with some added spring water to maintain some osmotic balance for the fish. I have plants, java moss, florite planting substrate with a top layer of black sand. I was expecting a PH close to 7, hoping to bring it around 6.8. After multiple ph tests and two attempts using PH down, I'm around 8 on the ph scale. My albis don't seem to mind, but I have heard it will affect spawning and the male holding or not. Other than the use of PH down, how can I ease my PH down?

#21 sde09001

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Posted 25 February 2012 - 09:48 AM

I wouldn't worry about pH too much if I were you unless it's extreme. Mine are breeding in 7.6, and I know professor who bred them in 3.0. It's more important that it's constant and not fluctuating then it is to get a specific reading. Hope that helps.

#22 coder

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Posted 25 February 2012 - 10:49 PM

Thanks for all the tips. I also read that females spit the eggs to the male on a flat surface. Which made me think I don't really have any flat surface in my tank and I have a sand bottom. Is that going to be a problem?

#23 sde09001

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Posted 26 February 2012 - 08:48 AM

No it shouldn't, What typically happens is during mating the eggs fall onto the male's anal fin and he collects them there. The female then comes over and picks them up off his anal fin and spits them to him for him to catch and hold. The eggs never touch the ground unless you have to two clumbsy bettas. lol




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