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c. habrosus


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#1 sarahberry

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Posted 09 January 2012 - 09:40 AM

A good friend of mine gave me a 20 gallon long, I'm pretty sure, because it's longer than it is tall... I have to get the exact measurements, but anywho...

Since getting the tank I have been researching and reading, watching youtube videos of various tanks and types of fish, schooling patterns, examining patterns on fish themselves. Comparing temperature/tank size needs, studying how to cycle a tank... you name it, I've been looking into it.

I've somehow been drawn to cories, and since it's not a huge tank I've been looking into the smaller ones. The c. habrosus in particular. They are cute, and I think 7 or 8 of them would be lively and a happy little shoal.

I also really have an attraction to guppies, they are very colorful and move so gracefully. I'm not too concerned with fry, from what I've read the guppies will likely eat most of them, and it seems like the cories probably would, too? If one or two make it to adulthood, woo hoo for him/her, right? I'd have to call the survivor Darwin. :)

I suppose my question is, would a tank like this work? Do guppies require a lot of plant cover? It seems (I think?) the cories would dig up plants if I put too many in there, and I want plenty of ground space for them to do their cory thing. I was thinking a few plants in the back and along the sides, caves for cover, sand substrate to keep the corys happy... If the guppies want more cover, maybe some floating plants? Or plants attached to the tops of the caves?

Thoughts/suggestions? Thanks in advance! :)

#2 Synirr

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Posted 09 January 2012 - 11:11 AM

IME, C. habrosus are too small to be much of a threat to plants... or anything else, for that matter :P. The tank you suggest would work, and if you'd like to make it more heavily planted, that wouldn't be a problem either. Some open space is good, but the cories will enjoy nosing around amongst the plants too.

One potential issue I see with this combination of fish is that cories like soft acidic water, whereas guppies prefer hard alkaline water. A neutral pH should be suitable for both, though.

#3 sarahberry

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Posted 09 January 2012 - 11:47 AM

Well, soft and acidic vs. hard and alkaline are pretty well opposite ends of the spectrum! Crumbs.

I suppose my first step should be getting myself a good test kit and finding out what kind of water comes out of my tap, and see if it's suitable for either of them, since I'm far too inexperienced to be messing with pH. I read the water quality report our city sent out not too long ago, but can't remember the particulars. I'm sure I have it around somewhere.

Is there a cute lil fishie better suited to the soft acidic water the corys prefer?

#4 sarahberry

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Posted 09 January 2012 - 12:00 PM

Found the report online- average hardness is 7.7. Rules out my little habrosus, doesn't it? :(

#5 Synirr

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Posted 09 January 2012 - 12:04 PM

There are a lot of other cool South American fish you could do... pencilfish, smaller tetra species, and dwarf cichlids like apistos and rams come to mind. Some species of danio and rasbora would work, as would any of the smaller gouramis like honey, dwarf, or sparkling gouramis.

ETA: Yeah, if you want to keep soft water species you would need to mix your tap with RO water to bring down the hardness. On the other hand, that's great for guppies :P

#6 sarahberry

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Posted 09 January 2012 - 01:30 PM

Playing with RO water and threatening the lives of innocent fish is too much for my first tropical tank!

I do love the guppies! :brows: And I've been eyeing the rams and kribs... hmm.

Back to the drawing board.

Thanks for your help! :thumbup:

#7 nikelodeon79

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Posted 16 January 2012 - 02:35 PM

I successfully kept C. habrosus with a pH of 7.6. They are fantastic, fun little guys, but are extremely sensitive to water quality. If you do decide to get some of them, definitely have a fully cycled tank, and I'd add your other fish first. Be sure to use the "drip acclimation" method when introducing them to your tank.

A fantastic companion to corydoras are small rasboras (like harlequins). Harlequins tend to stick to the upper regions of the tank, and cories like the bottom. A temp of around 75*F should be good for both species. Cories appreciate a bit of current, and absolutely use sand for substrate: you'll want something with small, rounded grains that do not vary a lot in size. I use playsand or "silica sand" from Menards. "Moonlight" sand from Caribsea is also nice, but quite expensive when compared to a bag of playsand.

I keep all my cories in planted tanks, and they do quite well. I am limited on the plants I keep, however, because cories need a shallow sand substrate (about 2-3 cm thick) to keep toxic gas pockets from building.




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