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Is aquarium salt good for bettas?


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#1 JEAUX

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Posted 16 March 2010 - 09:39 PM

Sorry if there already is a topic about this. I tried searching. Well I was wondering do I, or should I add aquarium salt even if I already added water conditioner? Or is aquarium salt just for sick bettas? Also if I have a high ph level would aquarium salt help that? Does aquarium salt effect the ph in any way? From the directions is seems to be just a water conditioner. I couldn't really find any info on here already so I thought this topic might be a good idea. Thanks for any advice.

#2 John

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Posted 16 March 2010 - 11:42 PM

I always use salt, others will differ but it can prevent infections and diseases as well, I only use a teaspoon per 10 gallons, others will use a tablespoon but I have other fish that don't appreciate salt as much.

And actually, my pH has lowered since I have consistently used salt, it can also help heal minor wounds that are common on Betta's, their long fins can sometimes get cut or pinched, or even bitten by themselves (research tail biting), the salt will help it heal quickly and reduce the risk of infection.

I don't know if others will disagree, but I say absolutely yes, use salt.

The exception is if you notice an overproduction of his slime coat, that is usually caused by irritation which could be the salt, at that point you should stop.

Edited by John, 17 March 2010 - 12:02 AM.


#3 JEAUX

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Posted 16 March 2010 - 11:49 PM

Thanks for the advice. I will probably put a tablespoon in. I only have bettas in the tank.

#4 John

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Posted 16 March 2010 - 11:52 PM

If it's only Betta's then yeah, a Tablespoon per ten gallons. In other words if your tank is less than 10 gallons then a tablespoon is probably too much.

#5 JEAUX

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Posted 16 March 2010 - 11:57 PM

Ok cool. Another thing I was gonna ask does it matter on the brand? I bought API salt already but I figured before I put it in to be sure everything was safe. I have learned an alot on this site already. I thought I knew alot about tropical fish in general but I was definitely off on what I thought I knew about bettas. I used to use aquarium salt in my other community tanks a while back. Thanks again for the advice

#6 John

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Posted 17 March 2010 - 12:01 AM

Brand doesn't matter as long as it is labeled Aquarium Salt. You will find Cichlid Salt, Sea Salt/Saltwater Salt, Table salt (lol), it needs to be Freshwater Aquarium salt, if your unsure, look on the package and see if it has dosing instructions for tropical fish, if it doesn't it's probably not for tropical fish.

I use API because it was available, but salt is salt as far as I'm concerned, just remember to dissolve it in a container before adding it!

#7 JEAUX

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Posted 17 March 2010 - 12:07 AM

Whoops! I already added it. I spread it around evenly though. Do you think it will hurt them? I was reading the directions and didn't see that step. I never did it with my other tanks either, but it make since now that mentioned it. After water change I will dissolve salt before adding.

#8 John

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Posted 17 March 2010 - 08:11 AM

Whoops! I already added it. I spread it around evenly though. Do you think it will hurt them? I was reading the directions and didn't see that step. I never did it with my other tanks either, but it make since now that mentioned it. After water change I will dissolve salt before adding.


You should be fine, I would just dissolve it from now on, the real risk is of the fish actually touching a piece of salt.

#9 Etcetera

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Posted 17 March 2010 - 11:49 AM

There's actually a lot of debate as to whether salt is good for bettas, since there aren't a lot of electrolytes in their natural environment, even though they do tolerate salt better than scaleless cat fish and neon tetras, for instance (which should never be exposed to salt.) I used to use a half-dose all the time, but I have stopped doing so because I realized that it didn't make very much sense at all if the fish were not sick. Salt is not a real preventative, I've still had a fish get ich due to temperature stress while using salt. I have come to the conclusion that the instruction given to dose salt 100% of the time as a preventative is a ploy from the aquarium salt industry to get you to use up your products faster so that they get you to buy more products, and there really is no convincing evidence out there to the contrary. It's really up to you what you end up doing with your water, but these factors should also be considered.

Salt will not cure or kill your fish, but in certain conditions such as respiratory distress, external parasites, open wounds, tail biting, etc--salt will help clear the gills of excess mucus, increase bloodflow to the woundsite(s) to encourage new growth, promote slime coat production, and help turn some of the free ammonia (which shouldn't be present anyway) into harmless ammonium.

Not only should you dissolve your salt in the future, but if you're increasing the amount of salt in the water you should do so slowly, only pouring in small amounts of the dissolved salts at a time to prevent stressing the fish. Try not to just dump things in there suddenly. :)

Edited by Etcetera, 17 March 2010 - 11:54 AM.


#10 Isha

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Posted 17 March 2010 - 12:02 PM

Also... I'm still trying to study the effects of too much salt, at least in hard water. My fish came down with mystery SBD... which ONLY started to clear after I stopped adding salt on my water changes. So yeah... it's good for recovery in the case of wounds and other things... but now I'm no longer sure it's such a great idea to add it all the time.




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