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Some misconceptions I'd like to point out


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#13 halfmoonOCD

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Posted 15 December 2009 - 05:35 PM

So, would you say that a 50% water change per week in a cycled tank is still a fair recommendation?
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#14 Saucy

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Posted 15 December 2009 - 05:39 PM

Let the staff know if you want anything else added :)

#15 Saucy

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Posted 15 December 2009 - 05:53 PM

LGP would like to add....

It depends on stocking. The higher the stocking concentration, the more water you'd change. It also depends on what kind of fish/animals you have. Some people have more success with cherry shrimp when they only do top-offs and never do a water change, as they are sensitive to tiny parameter changes that other animals don't notice. On the other hand, I would never dream of doing less than 50% changes weekly on my puffer tank unless it was significantly undetstocked. Scaleless fish have high absorption rates and are more affected by chemicals that accumulate in the water - especially their own hormones. When any fish is exposed to high concentrations of its own or others' hormones, its body decides that there are too many fish in the water and that it should not grow any more to avoid overcrowding; it stunts. Puffers are more susceptible to stunting because they absorb more of the hormones. You must either understock a puffer tank or do large water changes every week, especially during the juvenile years, while it is still growing. Some animals are sensitive to even tiny amounts of nitrates; others are fine in normal concentrations of under 20ppm. Some animals are probably physically too delicate to deal with large water changes... I imagine that it would be hard to do a large water change on a jellyfish tank without injuring it.

So, really, it's a matter of how much and what is in your tank.






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