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Neocaridina heteropoda (yellow): Yellow Shrimp


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#1 AnneRiceBowl

AnneRiceBowl

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 04:29 PM

Scientific Name: Neocaridina heteropoda(yellow)

Common Name: Yellow shrimp

Origin: Color morph created in Japan in 2006

Size: females up to 3 cm (1.2 in.)

Water Parameters: 6.5 to 7.5 pH (sometimes higher)

Temperature: Best housed at 65*F to 80*F

Feeding: Micro-things in the aquarium, algae, frozen bloodworms, blanched (par-boiled) vegetables (such as peas, zucchini, etc.), dead fish and shrimp, decaying plant matter

Larval Development: Suppressed; No larval stage; Eggs hatch to miniature adults

Behavior: Non-aggressive

Difficulty: Easy


Quick History
This species and variety of yellow shrimp was created from Neocaridina heteropoda (wild). Same species and care, just a different color. This is one of the only yellow shrimp currently available in the hobby. This species of yellow shrimp was first available to other countries outside of Japan (where the color morph originated) in 2006.

Water Parameters
Yellow shrimp are another great shrimp for the beginner shrimp addict keeper. They are tolerant of a wide range of pH from 6.5 to 7.5, hard or soft water. Yellow shrimp can also thrive in stable temperatures from 65*F to 80*F (sometimes higher or lower).

Breeding
Yellow shrimp are prolific breeders (comparable to guppies). Simply add male and female yellow shrimp, clean water, proper water parameters, and wait for the eggs to hatch. Females will display a yellow "saddle" (named this because it looks like she has an English saddle on her back when her ovaries are carrying unfertilized eggs. When she molts, she also releases hormones and pheromones into the water. This will send all males in the aquarium into a breeding frenzy, and the males will swim vigorously in their search to find the freshly-molted female. The lucky male will flip her over on her back and mate with her. If copulation is successful, the eggs leave the ovaries (the saddle will disappear), and she will carry the fertilized eggs in her swimmerets (legs under her tail) for about 30 to 45 days (shrimp addicts keepers called this "berried"). As the eggs develop and if you look closely enough, you can see the eggs turned slightly different colors and also see small, black dots which are the eyes of the developing shrimp inside the eggs. If the female drops any eggs while she is berried, do not fret. She will sometimes drop eggs because the are not fertile, she maybe stressed due to water parameters, another male may have been aggressive towards her, she may be a first-time mother, or something just wasn't right. A healthy female shrimp can be berried and display a saddle at the same time. The female will not molt while she is berried, and she may spend most of her time perched somewhere fanning her eggs. Fanning keeps the eggs moving and aerated to promote healthy shrimplets and their development.

Housing
Yellow shrimp are not too picky about their surroundings. They can be kept in planted tanks (which is my preference), bare bottom tanks, and even clown puke tanks (which I do not recommend). Ten gallon aquariums are highly recommended for the novice shrimp addict keeper because it's easier to keep water parameters under control, and because it's a great size to start with a small shrimp colony and watch it grow. A good substrate is one that is inert (will not affect the water parameters and pH) and one in which makes the shrimp stand-out. I always recommend as dark a substrate as possible. A light for the tank is also recommended but not exactly necessary so the shrimp can be seen and to promote the growth of micro-things and algae for the shrimp to feed on. Housing these shrimp with carnivorous fish is not recommended. Shrimp are very near the bottom of the food chain. Shrimplets are especially prone to predation because of their bite-sized stature.

Feeding
Yellow shrimp are not picky eaters. They will gladly eat just about anything, but a stable, healthy diet is always preferred. Vegetable such as blanched (parboiled) zucchini, spinach, peas, algae growing in the aquarium, nori wraps (used for making Sushi rolls, and the stuff sold for feeding saltwater fish--same stuff BTW, but the nori sold in the grocery stores is cheaper and you get more for your money), and even cleaned strawberries. They will also eat frozen foods like bloodworms. Dried spirulina flakes and flake fish food can be fed. They will also eat decaying plant matter, decaying fish, and decaying shrimp. Live foods can also be cultured. Yellow shrimp do not have to be fed every day, especially if their tank is "aged". The more aged the tank is, the more micro-things there are in the tank for them to eat.

Sexing
Yellow shrimp are easy to sex. One of the first obvious differences is that the female has a saddle on her back. Males do not have a saddle for obvious reasons. Females are usually slightly larger than the male, and she also has a larger tail than the male so she can carry eggs. The female will display more color than the male. Males are smaller and have a thinner and shorter tail than the female.

Coloration
Females are yellow and can display different color intensities. They will be more yellow due to genetics and also based on how comfortable they are. Good water parameters make for colorful, happy shrimp. Males will display less yellow than females.



#2 AnneRiceBowl

AnneRiceBowl

    Look Into My Eyes...

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,897 posts
  • Location:Papillion, NE
  • Real Name:Not Anne.
  • Gender:Not Sure
  • Age:28
  • Betta Count:1
  • Total Fish Count:1
  • Referred By:bettabelieveit
  • Statement:Always look on the bright side of life.

Posted 15 January 2009 - 11:12 PM

Thank you for pinning!




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